Tricia Cyr | Guilford Real Estate, Branford Real Estate, Madison Real Estate


If you’re in the market to buy a home soon, you probably have a long list of things to look for. You also are most likely focused on savings and shopping around for the best mortgage rates. You may know everything that you should do when you’re buying a home, but has anyone told you what you shouldn’t do? Read on to discover some of the worst practices of people searching for a home. 


Lack Of Research


You need to search for a home before you even set out to look at properties in person. While you’ll want to work with a realtor, you should know what you want before you start working with him. Your agent will be able to set up alerts for you that enable you to see properties put on the market as soon as they become available. This search will be tailored to your wants such as a large yard, master bathroom, or separate dining area. If you understand what your needs will cost you in relation to your budget ahead of time, working with a real estate agent will be a more fruitful experience.


Not Letting Your Real Estate Agent Do Their Job


Real estate agents are experts in the housing market. Your agent will research prices and help you to understand what a reasonable offer on a property will be. Your agent has the tools to get you the information you need to make an informed offer on a property. Sellers get insulted if an offer is well below the asking price. Trust that your agent knows what he’s talking about. 


You’ll have a close relationship with your agent throughout the house hunting process. You’ll need to make arrangements with your agent to go to open houses and home showings. Your agent will accommodate you to the best of his ability. All you need to do is communicate with them. 


Not Looking Beyond The Online Search


If you are out and about and see a property for sale that interests you, don’t assume that it’s out of your reach. Sometimes the online searches miss things. A property may include (or not include) something that you’re looking for. You can take down the address where you saw the “for sale” sign and speak with your real estate agent about it.


Skimming Over Properties


When you have the opportunity to look at a property, really take the time to view it. You can miss a lot of details by quickly going over a property due to your first impression. There’s a lot of things that you may not see if you don’t look at the details of a home as you walk through it.       



Establishing a homebuying budget can be tough. But for those who want to secure a terrific home at an affordable price, entering the housing market with a budget in hand can make it easy to accelerate the homebuying cycle.

Now, let's take a look at three questions to consider about a homebuying budget.

1. How much money have I saved for a home?

Examine your finances and see how much money is readily available for a home purchase.

Remember, the more money that is at your disposal, the more likely it becomes that you'll be able to secure your dream residence in no time at all.

Although savings are important, it is essential to note that those who have little to no money saved still have plenty of time to get ready for the homebuying journey. And if you start saving a little bit each day, you can move closer to accomplishing your homeownership dreams.

2. Do I need to get a home loan?

In most instances, a homebuyer will need to obtain a home loan so he or she can purchase a residence. Luckily, many lenders are available to help you discover a home loan that matches or surpasses your expectations.

Meet with a variety of lenders in your area – you'll be glad you did. Each lender can provide insights into assorted home loan options, explain how each home loan works and respond to your home loan concerns and questions.

Also, it often helps to get pre-approved for a mortgage. If you have a mortgage available when you enter the real estate market, you'll know exactly how much you can spend on a residence, thereby reducing or eliminating the temptation to overspend on a house.

3. How will my monthly expenses change after I buy a house?

Owning a home is different from renting an apartment. As such, you'll want to account for all potential expenses as you create a homebuying budget.

For example, a homeowner will be responsible for any home cable, internet and phone bills. This property owner also will need to consider any home maintenance costs like those associated with mowing the lawn in summer or removing snow from the driveway in winter.

Crafting a homebuying budget that accounts for your personal finances can be tricky. If you need additional support along the way, lenders may be able to provide expert tips to ensure you can acquire a wonderful house without exceeding your financial limitations.

Lastly, don't forget to reach out to a real estate agent for help along the homebuying journey. A real estate agent is a housing market professional who will go above and beyond the call of duty to assist you in any way possible. From setting up home showings to negotiating with home sellers on your behalf, a real estate agent will make it easy for you to secure a superior home at a budget-friendly price.

Consider the aforementioned homebuying budget questions, and you can speed up the homebuying process.


No matter how you look at it, decluttering a home is a big job, yet the rewards are very promising. For some people, however, the challenge is not knowing what to do. Here a few easy ways that you can start getting rid of clutter in your own home.

Your medicine drawer is probably one of the most natural places to begin decluttering. Throw away all expired drugs, skin care products, toiletries and every other thing that you don't use any longer. Keep the most frequently used items directly in front, and at eye level, so you quickly access them next time. 

Now you can move to your bedroom. Look for items that you no longer use, such as bad chargers, pens that no longer write or even old shoelaces. Arrange your bed and fold all articles of clothing strewn about. Go through your cabinets and dressers, one drawer after the other. Take out clothes that you no longer wear and bag them for donation. Tackle your dressing table and go through the items there, some things are probably not going to be used anymore, so you should discard them. The goal decluttering is to make your home as light as possible. 

If you have a reading table, you want to put back your books in their proper places on your bookshelf. Do away with irrelevant papers like old brochures, newsletters, and pamphlets. If you think that you may need some information there, take a picture of it and save it to the cloud.

Having earned some momentum, you can move to your kitchen, which is often harder to declutter as it is the center of so many activities. Thoroughly assess each area of the kitchen and put everything back where it belongs. That includes items like knives, work boards and so on.

Open up your drawers and cabinets and do away with all unusable items. Look for things that you don't use but keep for some sentimental reasons and pack them up to donate if you don't feel comfortable about throwing them out. Keep things that you don't need in storage.

Finally, you are ready to move to the living room. Your living room will probably require more regular decluttering than any other part of your home. Put away things that you don’t need, such as magazines and phone chargers. Assess the electronic and sound system too, store away some of the things you don’t use and donate what you don’t need. If you need ideas on where to donate, run a web search of charities in your locality to find out too for options.


4 br ,2.5bth Colonial minutes to downtown Madison & Hammonasett State Park Set back off road gives you the privacy & serene setting. Features 17 x 18 Sunroom w/ cathedral ceiling, surrounded by sliders onto deck overlooking peaceful yard sure to provide tranquility after a long day. Other features include eat in kitchen, cozy family room w/ wood burning stove, formal dining room, formal living room, hardwood flrs, master br w/ walk in closet & private bath, partially finished lower lever, plenty of room for office and exercise room, huge 2 car attached garage . This home offers a perfect balance of convenience and ability to enjoy a more relaxed lifestyle.

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There is always an undeniable appeal to move into a brand new home. After all, there shouldn’t be any problems with a new construction home, right? While shiny new appliances and brand new flooring can be appealing, there are many advantages to buying an older home.


The Price


It may seem obvious, but older homes are less expensive than newer homes. You might be able to get a bit more for your money if you decide to buy an older home. 


Construction Quality


Older homes tend to have a bit better quality in their construction. Some aspects of older construction homes cannot even be reproduced with all of the technology that we have in the present day. It’s often true that “they don’t build homes like they used to.” Certain building materials of the past are actually more sturdy than the materials that are used in the present day. Older homes have stood the test of time for a reason! 


The Location Is An Established Neighborhood


If you’re not looking to move into an up and coming neighborhood, you could be better off buying an older construction home. You’ll know that a neighborhood has already been established and that people have enjoyed living in the area for years before you got there when you find an older home to purchase. In finding a neighborhood, you’ll look at the important factors like the school district, the walkability of the area and the crime rate. Older homes tend to be in more stable areas. Keep that in mind. 


Older Homes Have More Personality


Sure, you could move into a street with new construction and be happy there. Yet, if you move into an older home, you will find a lot of advantages. The landscaping may be more well-established, allowing you to find your favorite features on the outside of the home right when you move in. In a new home, it could take years to establish the same type of curb appeal that you’ll get from moving into an older home.    

 

There’s More Space In An Older Home


An older home may afford you much more yard space and overall square footage. As the world gets more and more developed, space runs short. Older homes were constructed at times when space was at a maximum. These homes were built on larger lots, giving homeowners the advantage of more space. 


While you may think that buying a new construction home is the way to go, older homes offer many different things that newer construction homes just can’t bring to the table. Broaden your search and look for older homes, you could be very surprised!   





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